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Democrat Jared Polis submits signatures in bid to make primary ballot for Colorado governor’s race

Author: Ernest Luning - March 15, 2018 - Updated: March 16, 2018

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U.S. Rep. Jared Polis kicked off his campaign for Colorado Governor with four stops including Colorado Springs. Polis stopped and toured the employee-owned Save-A-Lot grocery store in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on Monday, June 12, 2017. Polis is a Democrat from Boulder. (Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette)

Democrat Jared Polis, a five-term congressman from Boulder, on Wednesday submitted more than three times the number of signatures required to make Colorado’s June primary ballot for governor, his campaign said.

The signatures still must be verified by the Colorado secretary of state, but the Polis campaign turned in what it said were petitions bearing 33,000 signatures. He needs 1,500 valid signatures from Democrats registered in each of the state’s seven congressional districts, for a total of 10,500.

“Today we submitted 33,000 petitions to the Secretary of State to get on the ballot to be the next #COgov!” the Polis campaign tweeted. “This was a 100% grassroots effort. A HUGE thank you to our tireless field organizers and volunteers for their amazing work!”

Polis is one of six Democrats running for the office held by term-limited Gov. John Hickenlooper, a Democrat. As many as 10 Republicans are running.

Polis is the second Democratic gubernatorial candidate to get in his potions. Three weeks ago, former state Sen. Mike Johnston, D-Denver, turned in what his campaign said were more than 20,000 signatures, which are in the process of being checked by election officials. Two other Democrats — Lt. Gov. Donna Lynne and businessman Noel Ginsburg — are also circulating petitions for governor.

Polis also plans to go through the state party assembly on April 14, where he can qualify for the June 26 primary by receiving at least 30 percent of the delegate vote. If he receives less than 10 percent, his petitions won’t count, even if he has enough signatures.

Other Democrats going through assembly are State Treasurer Cary Kennedy, who won a preference poll conducted at precinct caucuses last week, and tech entrepreneur Erik Underwood, who ran for the U.S. Sent nomination two years ago as a Republican. Johnston and Ginsburg have also said they’re going through assembly, although both fell below the 10-percent threshold in last week’s preference poll, which was used to apportion assembly delegates.

Candidates who are petitioning onto the ballot have until Tuesday to deliver their signatures to the secretary of state’s office.

Ernest Luning

Ernest Luning

Ernest Luning is a political correspondent for Colorado Politics. He has covered politics and government for newspapers and online news sites in Colorado for more than 25 years, including at the Highlands Ranch Herald, the Jefferson Sentinels chain of community newspapers and the Aurora Sentinel, where he was the city hall and cops reporter. After editing the Aurora Daily Sun, he was a political reporter and blogger for The Colorado Independent site. For nearly a decade, he was a senior political reporter and occasional editor at The Colorado Statesman before the 119-year-old publication merged with Colorado Politics in 2017.