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Ernest LuningErnest LuningJune 8, 201611min433

Denver police on Wednesday arrested the woman accused of forging signatures on petitions she was paid to gather for Republican U.S. Senate candidate Jon Keyser. Prosecutors filed 34 felony forgery charges Monday against Maureen Marie Moss, 45, who stands accused of submitting 34 fraudulent signatures belonging to voters in Denver, Jefferson and Arapahoe counties on nominating petitions Keyser used to gain access to the June primary ballot.


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Colorado PoliticsColorado PoliticsJune 5, 20162min336

"Raise The Bar" is a newly packaged campaign designed to serve some elected officials who want to insulate their influence at the legislature from contrary intentions of a majority of voters. They wish to make it difficult for ballot questions immune from overturn by the legislature to reach the ballot. Initiative 96 resembles a power play by officials vs. the public. Politically active citizens know that the special interests of the legislature plus lobby don’t always serve the public interest. In this case ballot initiatives that are constitutional amendments may be the only way the public can arrange to be well served.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningMay 25, 20168min402

Republican Ryan Frazier learned Wednesday afternoon that votes cast for him in the June U.S. Senate primary will count, following a court ruling and a circuitous path that led through the Colorado Supreme Court. The Colorado Supreme Court on Tuesday sided with Frazier on several points in an appeal he filed to overturn a ruling by election officials that he didn’t turn in enough signatures to make the ballot, but justices sent the case back to Denver District Court to determine whether enough signatures are valid. The order told the lower court to issue its decision by 5 p.m. Friday.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningMay 19, 201611min344

Thirty-Five Years Ago this week in The Colorado Statesman … Some of the money allegedly embezzled from the Central Bank for Cooperatives in Denver by Eve Lincoln, a former coordinator for Secretary of State Mary Estill Buchanan’s 1980 Senate campaign, could have been used to help finance Buchanan’s petition drive to get on the ballot, the Republican’s former campaign manager said. Under federal election law, if that’s what had happened, it could have counted as an illegal corporate campaign contribution, said Curt Uhre, who helmed Buchanan’s bid. He explained that was why the campaign had reimbursed the bank $2,591 just six days before