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Jessica MachettaDecember 24, 20173min747

Former state treasurer and Democratic candidate for governor Cary Kennedy held a 25-hour “tweetstorm” Thursday, one tweet per hour for every new person that moves into Colorado, 25 each day.

Also this week, Kennedy unveiled her goal of improving the state’s transportation challenges and expanding broadband in rural areas.

“Growth is a top concern,” Kennedy said on Twitter. “My #CKplanforgrowth tackles issues like housing, transportation & protecting the Colorado we love.”

“Colorado has gone too long without preparing for growth,” she said in a press release. “Our deteriorating roads and inadequate transit systems hold our state back and cost us time and money. Our state is innovative and forward looking, but we haven’t made the necessary investments. I know as a working mom how frustrating it is when you miss dinner with your family because you’re stuck in traffic. We can do better.”

Kennedy’s four-tiered plan includes making Colorado affordable; protecting public lands and open spaces; investing in transportation, housing, water conservation, clean renewable energy and broadband; and standing up for middle-class families.

“I’ve watched Colorado’s population double since I was a kid,” Kennedy told Colorado Politics. “And now, forecasters are telling us it’s going to double again by the time my teenagers are my age.”

The political reality, however, is that she will have to pay for such goals and possibly wrangle support from moderates and Republicans, depending on which party holds majorities in the state House and Senate next year. That dynamic quickly fills lofty campaign promises with hot air.

While serving as chief financial officer for Denver, Kennedy helped start the city’s first affordable housing initiative, a plan she would make statewide if elected.

“People can’t afford to live in the communities where they grew up, and can’t afford to live in the communities where they work, so that’s added to our traffic congestion problem,” she said.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningDecember 9, 20175min1788

State Rep. Steve Lebsock, the Thornton Democrat facing complaints he sexually harassed a fellow lawmaker and a former lobbyist, on Friday chastised social media denizens who've been heaping criticism on state Rep. Lori Saine, the Firestone Republican arrested and jailed this week at Denver International Airport for bringing a loaded handgun to a security checkpoint.


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Associated PressAssociated PressDecember 8, 201714min576

FARGO, North Dakota — Maria Modi's journey from South Sudan to a new life in Fargo included a stop at a refugee camp in Cairo. She and her seven siblings know what it is like to be hungry. "My mother and father work 12-hour shifts and still sometimes we don't get enough food at home to last us a week," said Modi, a Fargo North High School senior who plans to study music and theater in college next year.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningDecember 7, 20174min1831

U.S. Reps. Ken Buck, a Windsor Republican, and Kathleen Rice, a Long Island Democrat, on Wednesday launched a bipartisan House caucus devoted to coming up with what organizers call common-sense congressional reforms. The two lawmakers — both former elected district attorneys — are co-chairs of the Congressional Reformers Caucus, which counts 10 Democrats and nine Republicans on its initial roster, their offices announced. U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman, an Aurora Republican, is also a member.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningDecember 5, 201712min1952

Both sides agree it's a question of rights but differ sharply whose rights should prevail under the law in a case argued Tuesday before the U.S. Supreme Court — whether it's the baker and his religious beliefs or the same-sex couple and their right to be treated like any other customers. As the divisive case had its day in court — pitting Masterpiece Cakeshop owner Jack Phillips against the married couple, Charlie Craig and David Mullins — Colorado politicians hewed mainly along partisan lines assessing the case.